The promise of longer life is something that has captivated people for centuries. And while the Fountain of Youth has so far eluded us, researchers are constantly looking for new ways to extend our longevity. One promising avenue is the use of peptides to fight aging. peptides have a variety of anti-aging properties that could lead to longer, healthier lives for everyone. In this post, we’ll explore the potential of peptides and what they could mean for the future of longevity.

WHAT ARE PEPTIDES AND WHAT DO THEY DO IN THE BODY?

Peptides are made up of smaller units called amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. In the body, peptides perform a variety of important functions. They can act as hormones, enzymes, or even neurotransmitters. They are able to do this because they can bind to and activate receptors on cells. This interaction between peptides and cells is what allows them to exert their various effects in the body. There are many different types of peptides, each with its own unique function. For example, there are peptides that can increase collagen production, which can help improve skin elasticity and reduce wrinkles. There are also peptides that can help to increase muscle mass, and others that can boost the immune system.

 There are two main types of receptors: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and enzymes.

GPCRs are found on the surface of cells, and they are activated when a peptide binds to them. This binding causes a change in the shape of the receptor, which in turn activates the G protein. The G protein then signals to other molecules inside the cell, resulting in a change in the function of that cell. For example, GPCRs can stimulate the production of enzymes, hormones, or proteins.

Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the body. When a peptide binds to an enzyme, it can change the shape of that enzyme. This change in shape can either increase or decrease the activity of the enzyme. For example, some peptides can bind to enzymes that break down collagen, resulting in less collagen being produced. Other peptides can bind to enzymes involved in cell proliferation, resulting in an increase in cell growth.

Hormones vs Peptides

Hormones are another class of molecules that can bind to and activate receptors on both nuclear (within) and surface (on) the cells. Meaning, they can also exert a variety of effects in the body. However, there are some important differences between hormones and peptides. First, hormones are typically much larger molecules than peptides. This difference in size is due to the fact that peptide hormones are made up of multiple amino acids, while peptides are made up of just a few. Second, hormones are typically produced in endocrine glands (such as the pituitary gland or the thyroid gland), while peptides can be produced in many different tissues throughout the body. Finally, hormones circulate throughout the bloodstream, and have a systemic effect on cells anywhere in the body.  Because of their size, hormones tend to have a more long-lasting effect in the body than peptides. In contrast, peptides are often localized to a specific area and only affect the cells nearby. For example, a peptide produced in the gut will only affect cells in the gut. This specificity means that peptides can be designed to have very specific effects in the body. This is why they are being studied for their potential use in a variety of different treatments.

Peptides are not meant to replace hormones, but they can be used to supplement them. For example, if someone is deficient in a particular hormone, peptides can be used to help increase levels of that hormone. Peptides can also be used to target specific receptors that are not affected by hormones. Hormones play a different role than peptides, and they work together to maintain homeostasis in the body.

How Do Peptides Work?

Peptides work by interacting with receptors on cells. This interaction can result in a change in the function of that cell. For example, some peptides can stimulate the production of collagen, while others can increase muscle mass. The specific effect that a peptide has depends on the type of receptor it binds to. There are two main types of  receptors: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and enzymes.

GPCRs are found on the surface of cells, and they are activated when a peptide binds to them. This binding causes a change in the shape of the receptor, which in turn activates the G protein. The G protein then signals to other molecules inside the cell, resulting in a change in the function of that cell. For example, GPCRs can stimulate the production of enzymes, hormones, or proteins.

Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the body. When a peptide binds to an enzyme, it can change the shape of that enzyme. This change in shape can either increase or decrease the activity of the enzyme. For example, some peptides can bind to enzymes that break down collagen, resulting in less collagen being produced. Other peptides can bind to enzymes involved in cell proliferation, resulting in an increase in cell growth.

Peptides Used in Anti-Aging

There are a variety of different peptides that have been studied for their potential use in anti-aging treatments. Some of the most common include:

GHRPs

Growth hormone-releasing p[1]eptides are a class of peptides that stimulate the release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. Growth hormone is important for a variety of different functions in the body, including muscle growth, fat metabolism, and bone density. GHRPs are thought to be beneficial for anti-aging because they can help increase muscle mass, reduce body fat, and improve bone density.

GHK-Cu

Copper peptides are a type of peptide that has been shown to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration. GHK-Cu is a copper peptide that has been specifically studied for its anti-aging properties. GHK-Cu has been shown to stimulate the production of collagen and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. It has also been shown to improve wound healing and promote tissue regeneration.[2]

PKC Inhibitors

Protein kinase C (PKC) is an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and cell death. PKC inhibitors are peptides that bind to PKC and prevent it from performing its function. PKC inhibitors are thought to be beneficial for anti-aging because they can help prevent cell death and promote cell proliferation. [3]

BPC57

BPC57 is a peptide that has been shown to have a variety of different effects, including reducing inflammation, stimulating wound healing, and promoting cell proliferation. BPC57 is thought to be beneficial for anti-aging because it can help reduce inflammation and promote tissue regeneration. [4]

Thymic Peptides

Thymic peptides are a type of peptide that is produced by the thymus gland. Thymic peptides are thought to be beneficial for the immune system, and they have also been shown to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration. Thymic peptides are thought to be beneficial for anti-aging because they can help improve the immune system and promote tissue regeneration. [5]

MOTS-C

MOTS-C has been shown to have a variety of different effects, including reducing inflammation, stimulating wound healing, and promoting cell proliferation.[6] MOTS-C is thought to be beneficial for anti-aging because it can help reduce inflammation and promote tissue regeneration.

While there is still much to learn about the potential use of peptides for anti-aging, the available evidence suggests that peptides can be beneficial for reducing the signs of aging. Peptides offer a unique approach to anti-aging, and we are hoping that they may provide a more effective, holistic, and safe alternative to traditional treatments. We can expect in the coming years, peptides will continue to play an important role in anti-aging treatments. With more research and development, we can expect to see even better results from these powerful molecules. Have you tried any peptide-based anti-aging products? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think!


[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5392015/

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6073405/

[3] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12056641/

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6271067/

[5] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2279904/

[6] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31369811/

In recent years, a new branch of medicine has been gaining popularity: functional medicine. Functional medicine is a type of care that focuses on identifying and treating the root cause of disease, rather than simply managing symptoms. If you’re considering whether or not functional medicine is right for you, it’s important to understand how it works and what it can do for you. In this week’s blog, we’ll cover the basics of functional medicine and help you decide if it’s the right type of care for you.

What is Functional Medicine?

Functional medicine is a branch of medical science that looks at the root cause of disease. It takes into account the whole person, their lifestyle, environment and genetic background when diagnosing and treating illness. This approach to medicine is becoming more popular as people become more aware of the need to address the whole person, not just their symptoms. Functional medicine can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, both chronic and acute. Rather than focusing on treating individual symptoms, functional medicine practitioners work to identify and address the underlying root causes of disease.

Functional medicine is based on the principle that all systems in the body are connected and that imbalances in one system can lead to problems in other systems. For example, an imbalance in the gut microbiome (the community of bacteria that live in the gut) has been linked to a wide range of chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. If you experience childhood trauma, that can lead to imbalances in the brain that increase your risk for anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders.

The Functional Medicine Matrix

Functional medicine practitioners use the Functional Medicine Matrix to guide their approach to care. The matrix is a tool that helps practitioners identify the underlying causes of disease and design individualized treatment plans.

The matrix includes six key areas:

-Diet and nutrition

-Gut health

-Sleep

-Stress management

-Exercise

-Hormone health

These six areas are interconnected, and imbalances in one area can lead to problems in another. For example, poor sleep can contribute to gut problems, and chronic stress can lead to hormone imbalances. By taking a comprehensive approach to care, functional medicine practitioners can help you restore balance in all areas of health.

What Does Functional Medicine Treat?

Functional medicine can be used to treat a wide range of chronic conditions, including:

-Autoimmune diseases

-Digestive disorders

-Mood disorders

-Fatigue

-Hormonal imbalances

-Skin conditions

-Weight problems

If you have any of these conditions, functional medicine may be right for you. The goal of treatment is to restore balance in the body and improve overall health, rather than simply treating individual symptoms. If you’re considering whether or not to see a functional medicine physician, we have listed 10 reasons why it may be the right fit for you.

8 REASONS TO SEE A FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE PHYSICIAN

1.     You want longer appointments.

Functional medicine appointments are usually longer than traditional doctor’s appointments. This allows your practitioner to get to know you and your health history in depth, and it gives you ample time to ask questions and discuss your concerns.

2.     You want personalized care

Functional medicine practitioners take a personalized approach to care. They will work with you to develop a treatment plan that is tailored to your unique needs and health goals. There is not a one sized fit all approach in functional medicine. In fact, each treatment plan is unique, just like each individual.

3.     You want a partner in health.

Functional medicine practitioners view their patients as partners in care. If you’re looking for a collaborative relationship with your physician, functional medicine may be right for you.

4.     You are willing to do the homework at home.

Functional medicine is not a quick fix, and it requires commitment and effort on your part. If you’re willing to make lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthier diet or exercising more, functional medicine may be right for you. Some modalities take time to show results as well. So, it’s important to be patient and understand that this is a journey, not a sprint. If you are simply looking for a pill to fix your health problems, functional medicine is not for you.

5.     You Suffer from Auto-Immune Conditions

Functional medicine is an excellent choice for those who suffer from auto-immune conditions. If you have an auto-immune disease, such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis, functional medicine may be right for you. These conditions are often caused by inflammation, and functional medicine practitioners are experts in managing inflammation.

6.     You understand it is an investment.

Functional medicine focuses on prevention, so tests are often used to identify imbalances before they become disease. Functional medicine practitioners often use advanced testing, such as food sensitivity testing or hormone testing, to help identify the root cause of symptoms. This may mean that you may have to pay for some tests out of pocket as insurance does not cover the advanced testing, longer appointments, and therapies used in functional medicine. In fact, most providers are cash based, meaning they do not accept insurance. However, many insurance companies are starting to cover functional medicine testing. If you’re looking for a more affordable option, consider seeing a provider who can provide a super bill, which you can submit to your insurance company for reimbursement.

7.     You want your concerns heard.

Have you ever been to the doctor with concerns and your labs are “in range”? You leave with a clean bill of health but you’re still not feeling great. In functional medicine, we understand that your concerns and symptoms are just as important as what shows up on a lab test. We take the time to listen to your story and connect the dots to find the root cause of your symptoms.

8.     You want to age well.

As we age, it’s important to maintain our health so that we can enjoy our later years. If you’re interested in aging well, functional medicine may be right for you. Functional medicine practitioners focus on preventive care, so they can help you avoid diseases that commonly occur as we age.

We are seeing people not just taking control of their own health and wellness, but we are also seeing the medical community taking a more personal approach to how they interact with patients. People are starting to realize that the only way for us all to be healthy is for everyone in our society to take responsibility for their own health and wellness by eating right, exercising, and doing the things that help us maintain good health. Many are now turning towards functional medicine in order to help them heal.

_______________________________________________________________

Institute for Human Optimization

We are seeing more a paradigm shift in healthcare.  At IfHO, we partner with you to become your health intelligence partner with the goal of optimizing your health. We accomplish this with our signature precision medicine approach. Our providers use a combination of therapies that are tailored to your specific needs with a health optimization goal. We believe that our Medical Team should make use of the latest scientific research to offer our patients personalized medicine, based on real data. We call this precision health and it is the future of healthcare.

Our focus is not only looking at the root cause, but also to measure, quantify and optimize the patient’s personal health. We take a preventative approach, personalized, and precise approach in helping our patients control their risk factors early on in order to avoid chronic illness down the road. Our team of medical providers use a comprehensive approach with every patient that comes into our office, looking at all aspects of health including lifestyle, environment and genetics. There are no generic one size fit all protocols. No two patients receive the  same treatment plan since we work with each individual to create a personalized plan. We empower our patients with the right tools and information, so they can take control of their own health. This is the future of longevity!

Disclaimer: The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the information provided in this blog, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material contained on this website, or in any linked materials, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice and are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Before taking any medications, over-the-counter drugs, supplements or herbs, consult a physician for a thorough evaluation. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any website.

We all want to be healthy and feel our best, but sometimes it can be difficult to know exactly what metrics we should be monitoring in order to achieve optimal health. In this blog post, we will discuss 7 different metrics that you can use to gauge your own health and make necessary changes for health optimization. By understanding and tracking these key indicators, you will be well on your way to a healthier lifestyle.

WHAT IS HEALTH?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as health can be interpreted in many ways. If you are an athlete, health may have more to do with physical fitness and muscle mass. If you are a full-time worker, health may be more about managing your energy and stress levels and ensuring that you have enough time for your family at the end of the day. At the most basic level, however, health can be defined as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being. As a Physician, I believe that health isn’t just the absence of disease but that we all should thrive for optimal wellness.  There are many factors that contribute to our overall health, including mental, emotional, and social factors as well as physical ones. In order to achieve optimal health, it is important to consider all of these different aspects of our lives. Optimal wellness is not just about the absence of illness, but rather about feeling our best mentally, emotionally, and physically.

That being said, there are certainly some key indicators that we can use to measure our overall health. In this blog post, we will discuss 7 different metrics that you can monitor in order to achieve optimal health. Monitoring these key health metrics is one way to assess our overall wellbeing, and can help us to identify areas where we need to make changes in order to improve our health.

7 KEY METRICS TO MONITOR FOR OPTIMAL HEALTH

  1. Body Fat Percentage

Body Fat Percentage is one of the most important indicators of health, as excess body fat can lead to a variety of health problems. Body fat percentage is calculated by measuring the thickness of the subcutaneous fat layer at 6 different points on the body. The results are then used to calculate a person’s body fat percentage.

The ideal body fat percentage varies depending on gender and age, but a healthy range is generally considered to be between 10-25% for men and 20-35% for women. A person’s body fat percentage can be affected b[i]y a variety of factors, including age, genetics, diet, and exercise habits. Body Fat Percentage can be measured through a variety of methods, including bioelectrical impedance analysis, underwater weighing, and DEXA scanning. We want to avoid having high levels of body fat because it can lead to things such as heart disease, stroke, type II diabetes, and some types of cancer. If you notice that your Body Fat Percentage is outside of the healthy range, you may want to consider working with your Physician to implement changes to your diet and exercise habits in order to achieve a %.

2. Body Mass Index (BMI)

Another important indicator of health is Body Mass Index, or BMI. BMI is a calculation that takes into account a person’s height and weight. BMI has had a bad reputation in the past because it does not take into account a person’s body composition, but for most individuals it is still a valuable tool for assessing overall health especially in conjunction with body fat percentage and waist circumference measurements. For example, if you are an athlete or very muscular, you may have a high BMI even though you do not have excess body fat. For most however, a BMI that is too high or too low can indicate an increased risk for certain health problems. For men, a BMI of 18.5-24.9 is considered healthy, while a BMI of 25-29.9 is considered overweight and a BMI of 30 or above is considered obese. For women, the healthy range is slightly different, with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 considered healthy, a BMI of 25-29.9 considered overweight, and a BMI of 30 or above considered obese.

BMI can be calculated using the following equation: BMI = weight (kg) / height (m)2

There are several online calculators available to determine your BMI.

3. Waist Circumference

A third indicator of health is waist circumference. Excess belly fat, especially around the waist, can be a sign of increased risk for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, and type II diabetes. A healthy waist circumference is different for men and women. For men, a healthy waist circumference is less than 40 inches, while for women a healthy waist circumference is less than 35 inches.

You can measure your waist circumference by wrapping a measuring tape around your waist at the level of your navel.

4. Inflammation Levels

Inflammation is a natural process that helps your body fight infection and heal injuries. However, when inflammation becomes chronic, it can lead to a variety of health problems. With the rise of chronic inflammation, there has been a corresponding increase in chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer.

There are a number of ways to measure inflammation levels in the body. The most common way is to measure the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. CRP is a protein that is released into the blood in response to inflammation. A high CRP level indicates that you have a high level of inflammation in your body. Chronic inflammation is linked to a variety of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and arthritis. CRP levels can be easily measured with a blood test.

5. Hormone Levels

Hormone levels are another important indicator of overall health. Hormones are substances that are produced by the body and that control the function of various organs and tissues. There are a number of different hormones, each with its own specific function. Some types include:

  • estrogen
  • thyroid
  • estriol
  • estradiol
  • estrone
  • progesterone
  • testosterone
  • DHEA-S (dehydroepiandrosterone)
  • cortisol

If we look at Testosterone, it is a hormone that is produced by the testes in men and the ovaries in women. Testosterone plays a role in a number of important bodily functions, including bone health, muscle mass, energy levels, and sex drive. Testosterone levels begin to decline as you age, and low testosterone levels can lead to a number of health problems, including decreased muscle mass, increased body fat, and reduced energy levels. This metric made its way to our list because in both men and women, testosterone is important for mental health, bone density, and more.

Cortisol:  This is a hormone that is released by the adrenal gland in response to stress. Cortisol plays a number of important roles in the body, including regulating blood pressure, metabolism, and blood sugar levels. high cortisol levels can lead to a number of health problems, including high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes.

DHEA-S:   This is a hormone that is produced by the adrenal gland. DHEA-S is a precursor to testosterone and estrogen. DHEA-S levels can be used as an indicator of how well your adrenal gland is working. High DHEA-S levels may indicate that you are coping well with stress. Low DHEA-S levels may indicate that you are under a lot of stress.

6. Vitamin D Level

Vitamin D is not a vitamin but acts like a hormone in the body. It is important for optimal health and helps regulate calcium and phosphate levels in the blood, which are essential for strong bones and teeth. Vitamin D also helps keep your immune system healthy by supporting the function of your white blood cells. Vitamin D levels can be easily measured with a blood test or a urine test.

Most people get their vitamin D from sun exposure, but it is also found in some foods, including salmon, tuna, and eggs. Most people do not get enough vitamin D, which can lead to health problems.

7. Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is another important indicator of overall health. Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of your arteries as it circulates through your body. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is expressed as two numbers, the systolic pressure and the diastolic pressure. The systolic pressure is the pressure when your heart contracts and pumps blood out, and the diastolic pressure is the pressure when your heart relaxes and fills with blood. A healthy blood pressure is below 120/80 mmHg. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a condition in which the systolic pressure is 140 mmHg or above and/or the diastolic pressure is 90 mmHg or above. 

High blood pressure can lead to a variety of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. If you are concerned that you may have high blood pressure, you should consult with your doctor. Blood pressure can be easily measured with a home blood pressure monitor or at your doctor’s office.

It may feel like a lot to monitor, but taking a holistic and individualized approach to your health is the best way to ensure that you are doing everything possible to maintain or improve your health. These six key metrics provide a good starting point, but you may find that you need to add or subtract other measures depending on your specific situation. By keeping an eye on these important health indicators, you can be proactive in preserving your health and preventing disease.


References

[i] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6356293/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15983235/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4032609/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027970/

Institute for Human Optimization

We are seeing more a paradigm shift in healthcare.  At IfHO, we partner with you to become your health intelligence partner with the goal of optimizing your health. We accomplish this with our signature precision medicine approach. This may include functional, traditional, naturopathic and/or homeopathic medicine. Our providers use a combination of therapies that are tailored to your specific needs with a health optimization goal. We believe that our Medical Team should make use of the latest scientific research to offer our patients personalized medicine, based on real data. We call this precision health and it is the future of healthcare.

Our focus is not only looking at the root cause, but also to measure, quantify and optimize the patient’s personal health. We take a preventative approach, personalized, and precise approach in helping our patients control their risk factors early on in order to avoid chronic illness down the road. Our team of medical providers use a comprehensive approach with every patient that comes into our office, looking at all aspects of health including lifestyle, environment and genetics. There is no generic one size fit all protocols. No two patients receive the same treatment plan since we work with each individual to create a personalized plan. We empower our patients with the right tools and information, so they can take control of their own health. This is the future of longevity!

Disclaimer: The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the information provided in this blog, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material contained on this website, or in any linked materials, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice and are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Before taking any medications, over-the-counter drugs, supplements or herbs, consult a physician for a thorough evaluation. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any website.

What do you think of when you hear the word “metabolism?” Most people probably think about how quickly or slowly their body burns calories. And while metabolism does play a role in weight control, it’s just one piece of the puzzle. In fact, your metabolism changes as you age, but not necessarily in the way you expect. To learn more, keep reading.

WHAT IS METABOLIC FUNCTION?

Metabolism is all the chemical reactions that happen in your body. It’s how cells turn what you eat and drink into energy. Some of this happens automatically. For example, when you breathe in oxygen, your body uses it to burn glucose (a type of sugar) and produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the cell’s main source of energy. Other reactions require a bit more effort, like when your muscles contract to make them move.

All of these chemical reactions add up to what we call metabolism. Metabolic function refers to the metabolic rate which is the amount of energy that a person uses in a given time period. This can be affected by many factors such as age, body weight and height. In humans, the average metabolic function is 45 calories per hour for every 100 pounds of bodyweight (90 k/h for every kg).

HOW OUR METABOLISM CHANGES WITH AGE

Aging means different things to different people, but for most of us, it eventually brings with it declines in physical and mental health. During the aging process, many changes occur. Some are welcomed, like wisdom and self-assurance; others not so much—sagging skin, weight gain and wrinkles among them. One change that shouldn’t come as a surprise is modifications in your metabolism.

The speed of your metabolic function decreases with age, which means you burn fewer calories—about 2 percent per decade after the age of 25. There are physiological changes that occur with getting older such as a reduction in lean muscle mass and a slowing of your metabolism that led to weight gain. Some blame drops in hormones such as testosterone for this unwelcome change. In fact, some research indicates that in males the less testosterone you have, the more body fat you tend to carry.[i]

What else changes with age? Your body’s ability to regulate temperature. As you get older, you may find that you perspire less or not at all when it’s hot out, and need more layers to stay warm in the wintertime. [ii]

COMMONS SIGNS THAT YOUR METABOLIC FUNCTION MAY BE IMPAIRED

There are many signs that your metabolism is impaired. Some common ones include:

·     Loss of muscle mass

·     Weight gain (especially around the waist)

·     Getting sick more often than you used to

·     Needing caffeine or sugar to get through the day

Loss of muscle mass:

Once you start losing muscle, your metabolic function starts to slow down. Muscle is important for many reasons. Not only does it help with everyday tasks (like walking and moving groceries into the house), it also increases your resting metabolic rate (the number of calories that remain even when you’re at rest). This means that the more muscle you have, the higher your metabolism is.

Weight gain (especially around the waist):

Weight gain is often the first sign that your metabolic function is slowing down. Getting weight around your middle can be a warning sign of diabetes, high blood pressure and other health concerns. By understanding what’s happening to your body, you can begin to make changes now that will help prevent more serious complications down the road.

Needing caffeine or sugar to get through the day:

As you age, you are less sensitive to medications and hormones that normally stimulate your heart rate, breathing and other functions. This means that you need more of these stimulants—like caffeine—to keep yourself going. It’s important to know why you’re feeling tired. If it’s related to lifestyle, you can start making changes now that will improve your chances of staying healthy as you age.

One thing that cannot be changed is our genetic code, which tells our bodies how to build and maintain cells and tissues. You are born with genes that determine everything from your eye color to your weight. Genes work with the environment you’re in and determine how your body functions, including how quickly it burns calories.

Environmental factors can affect our metabolic function too. In fact, what we eat and drink on a daily basis has a major impact on our health, metabolism and body composition.

HOW DOES METABOLIC FUNCTION IMPACT OVERALL HEALTH?

A significant change in your metabolic function can have a big impact on your health. If the rate at which you burn calories is lower than what you’re using, you’ll gain weight. This may explain why there’s a link between lower metabolism and being overweight or obese as people age. In fact, one study found that for every 5 percent decrease in resting metabolic rate, a person’s risk of becoming obese increased by 30 percent.

While being overweight or obese puts you at greater risk for numerous health conditions, having too little body fat can have significant drawbacks as well. For example, people who are underweight may lack energy and have difficulty getting through the day. People with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa may also experience reduced metabolic function.

Extreme changes in weight can impact your body’s ability to function normally, too. For example, if you go on a very low-calorie diet to lose weight quickly, you’ll not only burn fewer calories, but your body will also most likely burn fewer calories at rest, which can result in a slower metabolism.

For many people, one of the most stressful events they face is moving to a new location or starting a new job. One universal truth about getting older is that life changes are inevitable. If you experience significant change, try not to get overwhelmed thinking all your plans for achieving health and wellness will be disrupted.

Take a deep breath, stop, and think through your options to create a plan that will help you handle the change as smoothly as possible. The calmer and more confident you can be in dealing with changes that happen in life, the less stress you’ll feel and the more likely it is that it will have a positive impact on your health.

METABOLIC HEALTH IS A RELATIONSHIP

Your body is a complex system made up of many parts that work together harmoniously. This means that what you eat and drink, how much activity you do and other aspects of your lifestyle affect your metabolism and health. It also means that if there’s a problem with one component, it can affect others too. For example:

If you don’t drink enough water, your body will work harder to digest food and absorb nutrients. If you eat more than you need, it may store extra calories as fat instead of burning them off.

Institute for Human Optimization

We are seeing more a paradigm shift in healthcare.  At IfHO, we partner with you to become your health intelligence partner with the goal of optimizing your health. We accomplish this with our signature precision medicine approach. This may include functional, traditional, and naturopathic medicine. Our providers use a combination of therapies that are tailored to your specific needs with a health optimization goal. We believe that our Medical Team should make use of the latest scientific research to offer our patients personalized medicine, based on real data. We call this precision health and it is the future of healthcare.

Our focus is not only looking at the root cause, but also to measure, quantify and optimize the patient’s personal health. We take a preventative approach, personalized, and precise approach in helping our patients control their risk factors early on in order to avoid chronic illness down the road. Our team of medical providers use a comprehensive approach with every patient that comes into our office, looking at all aspects of health including lifestyle, environment and genetics. There is no generic one size fit all protocols. No two patients receive the same treatment plan since we work with each individual to create a personalized plan. We empower our patients with the right tools and information, so they can take control of their own health. This is the future of longevity!

Disclaimer: The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the information provided in this blog, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material contained on this website, or in any linked materials, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice and are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Before taking any medications, over-the-counter drugs, supplements or herbs, consult a physician for a thorough evaluation. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any website.


[i] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4154787/

[ii] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22085834/